Arara Canindé

The Arara Canindé (Ara ararauna), also known as the Blue-and-Yellow Macaw or Blue-and-Gold Macaw, is a member of the group of large Neotropical parrots known as macaws. It breeds in forest  and woodland of tropical South America. These birds can reach 76–86 cm (29.9-33.9 inches) long and weigh 900 to 1300 g (2-3 lbs). They are vivid in appearance with blue wings and tail, dark blue chin, golden under parts and a green forehead. Beaks are black, and very strong for crushing nuts. The naked face is white, turning pink in excited birds, and lined with small black feathers. There is little variation in plumage across the range. Some birds have a more orangey or “butterscotch” underside color, particularly on the breast. The Arara Canindé uses its powerful beak for breaking nutshells, and also for climbing up and hanging from trees. The Arara Canindé generally mates for life. It nests in a tree hole and the female typically lays two or three eggs. The female incubates the eggs for about 28 days, and the chicks fledge from the nest about 90 days after hatching.